Author Help

Helping authors publish

Weekly News: 27th June 2022

Every week, we post a curated list of links that authors should find useful or interesting. Here are this week’s links:

Book a FREE consultation to find out how we can help you publish your book.

Weekly News: 20th June 2022

Every week, we post a curated list of links that authors should find useful or interesting. Here are this week’s links:

Book a FREE consultation to find out how we can help you publish your book.

Weekly News: 13th June 2022

Every week, we post a curated list of links that authors should find useful or interesting. Here are this week’s links:

  • To grow your audience, focus on these four areas.
  • It’s essential to use commas properly, not just in your book, but also in blog posts and other marketing.
  • Outrun your “Spock brain” and write faster.
  • There’s no point writing a press release that gets ignored. How to write one that makes people pay attention.
  • How to get your book into libraries.
  • How to plan your novel like a pro.
  • How to get endorsements for your book.

Book a FREE consultation to find out how we can help you publish your book.

Weekly News: 30th May 2022

Every week, we post a curated list of links that authors should find useful or interesting. Here are this week’s links:

Book a FREE consultation to find out how we can help you publish your book.

Weekly News: 23rd May 2022

Every week, we post a curated list of links that authors should find useful or interesting. Here are this week’s links:

Book a FREE consultation to find out how we can help you publish your book.

Weekly News: 16th May 2022

Every week, we post a curated list of links that authors should find useful or interesting. Here are this week’s links:

Book a FREE consultation to find out how we can help you publish your book.

The hidden advantage of print on demand and ebooks

Our authors’ books are available as ebooks, and as paperbacks using print on demand technology. Both technologies mean the books will never go out of print, unless the author specifically wants them to.

With print on demand, books are printed and bound as they are needed. There is no need for a large up-front investment to pay for a print run, and no need to store hundreds of books. But there is a less obvious advantage which I’d like to discuss here.

When a book is always available, it can benefit from unexpected interest in a way that isn’t possible otherwise. If something creates interest in your book, anyone that wants a copy will be able to buy it if it’s available as an ebook or print on demand.

Where demand comes from

You might be able to drive interest yourself. In an episode of the
AskALLi podcast, Orna Ross talked about promoting one of her older books to coincide with the centenary of an event in the book. This is likely to be a potential marketing hook for historical fiction and non-fiction authors, but there are possibilities for other authors too.

Perhaps someone else will cause a flurry of interest. It’s well known in publishing circles that a celebrity endorsement of a book can drive book sales. The Oprah Effect, named after Oprah Winfrey because her book club always generated a lot of interest and sales. Other celebrities also have book clubs. Reese Witherspoon has one with the stated goal of elevating female voices. The Richard and Judy book club is big in the UK, and Emma Watson has a feminist book club.

Book clubs aren’t the only things that can cause sudden interest in a book. In 2020, a podcast released audio readings of a book titled The Cauldron, written under the pseudonym Zeno. It had been published in 1966 and was out of print. Demand from podcast listeners pushed the price of second-hand copies up from a few pounds to over £100. Had the book been available as an ebook or print on demand, the listeners would have been able to buy copies at a sensible price. The publisher and author would have received their usual share of the sale, too. Second-hand sales at hugely inflated prices benefit the seller, but no-one else.

Unexplained demand

Sometimes it won’t be obvious what caused the interest. In 2021, libraries in the Philippines suddenly bought lots of ebook copies of Jen’s children’s book. We couldn’t find out what had caused this burst of sales. But it was available via the libraries’ supplier, so Jen was able to benefit, even without knowing where the interest came from.

This is the less obvious, and rarely discussed, advantage of print on demand and ebooks. If something provokes interest in your book, or with non-fiction, your book’s subject, readers can find and buy your book immediately, and at a sensible price. You get your standard royalty from those sales. Everybody wins.

Weekly News: 9th May 2022

Every week, we post a curated list of links that authors should find useful or interesting. Here are this week’s links:

Book a FREE consultation to find out how we can help you publish your book.

Weekly News: 2nd May 2022

Every week, we post a curated list of links that authors should find useful or interesting. Here are this week’s links:

Book a FREE consultation to find out how we can help you publish your book.

Weekly News: 25th April 2022

Every week, we post a curated list of links that authors should find useful or interesting. Here are this week’s links:

  • Orna Ross has predictions about what changes the next ten years will bring for self-published authors.
  • Watch out for marketing services that look impressive but don’t deliver value.
  • Audible has changed its tax reporting policy, which has implications for how authors file their tax returns.
  • Co-writing can bring great rewards, but there is a lot to consider before embarking on a joint project.
  • How to take an idea and turn it into a book.
  • Marketing isn’t just ads and social media. Be more creative with your marketing.
  • Customise the 404 error page on your website so that errors lead to sales.
  • Until 30th April, use discount code SPMC22 to get 50% off a SelfPubCon registration.

Book a FREE consultation to find out how we can help you publish your book.

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